Book Review: A Lonely Resurrection by Barry Eisler

Book cover for A Lonely Resurrection by Barry Eisler

A Lonely Resurrection made a pretty good follow up to the first John Rain novel, A Clean Kill in Tokyo, but I don’t know if this book was as good as the first. There was something compelling about the first novel where it felt like an assassin for hire rethinking his life and maybe looking for an out by trying to help someone with the unfortunate conclusion that he couldn’t get out. At least not yet.

The second novel picks up a little bit after the first book where he is finally deciding that he needs to get out of Japan for good to escape the events of the first book. However, he gets dragged back in by his friend, Tatsu, who wants John’s help to continue to go after the more corrupt aspects of Japan’s political structure.

I think where this book fell a little short for me from the first book is in the story. There didn’t seem anything as compelling in this one that carries John forward other than the fallout of trying to help out his friend and realizing that maybe his latest target isn’t worth the risk. That leads John into a series of events that end up turning out poorly for him. That’s not to say that this isn’t a good book. It was really good, and I found myself reading it over the other book I had picked up recently because I was hooked. I really like John Rain, even if he is a ruthless killer at times, but he seems to be struggling with his lifestyle choice a little more each time. That makes for some compelling reading as I watch the character struggle with his choices.

I’m curious where John Rain will go from here. I’m committed now to see where this story goes especially now that it seems John will stay in Japan to continue to do something. What that something is looks to be up in the air. I’ve already picked up the third book. I can’t wait to get started on that one too.

If you are a fan of thrillers, I’m starting to feel like this is a must-read. The character is fairly unique for me considering many of the thrillers I’ve read in the past two years seem to have main characters with similar military backgrounds working for some American agency or secret organization dealing with Middle Eastern stuff. I still like the location of the books so far. Reading about his adventures in Japan has been a refreshing change of pace.

Author’s website: http://www.barryeisler.com/